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[personal profile] drplacebo
It's Forgotten Masterpiece Friday!

Kurt Atterberg (1887-1974) was a part-time musician for his entire life, and yet was one of the most prolific composers of the 20th century with nine symphonies and five operas to his name among other works. He got his start in music later than most: he did not study music or play an instrument at all until he started cello lessons at 15. But he was a prodigy in some sense, in that he won a seat in the cello section of the Royal Stockholm Philharmonic just six years after he first picked up the instrument, while he was an engineering student. By that time, he had already begun to teach himself to compose. Immediately upon completing his degree in electrical engineering in 1911 he was awarded a fellowship to study composition at the Royal College of Music, Stockholm, on the basis of his Rhapsody for Piano and Orchestra and an incomplete draft of his first symphony. In 1912, the same year that he had the first public performance of his music -- his first symphony, with Atterberg himself conducting -- he accepted a position at the Swedish Patent Office. He continued to work as a patent examiner until he was 81, while continuing to compose and occasionally conduct in his spare time. He wasn't only a prolific composer; he also co-founded the Society of Swedish Composers and served as its president for more than 20 years, and was a music critic for a Stockholm newspaper for most of his life.

Atterberg's big break as a composer came in 1928, when the Columbia Gramophone Company sponsored an international symphony competition commemorating the centenary of Franz Schubert's death, and calling for symphonic works inspired by Schubert. Atterberg entered his Sixth Symphony, and surprisingly the Swedish patent examiner took the first prize over a number of much more prominent composers, suddenly making him an internationally-known composer. This also meant new-found attention for his prior music, much of which received its first performances outside Sweden in the years that followed.

His success as a composer was short-lived, however. During the Second World War, living in officially neutral Sweden, he maintained ties with Nazi-controlled musical organizations in order to secure continued performances of his music in Germany. After the war, rivals accused him of being a Nazi sympathizer. Although these accusations were never substantiated, Atterberg also did not have the same kind of fame as Richard Strauss, who had faced similar accusations. He lost the presidency of the Society of Swedish Composers, and his music was rarely performed until his reputation began to recover in the 1960s.
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[personal profile] orangerful
Well, I've been so caught up in the house stuff and other things, that I have fallen woefully behind on my friends list/reading list/social media. So instead of staying up until 2am trying to skim your posts, I'm just starting from today. Sorry about that. I still haven't found a balance between my new home on DW and keeping up with LJ people who didn't switch over and apparently I've just stopped checking everything because of it. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

This Friday we're going to see The Aquabats which is a band I wish I had known about sooner because they are just so geeky and fun. Their TV show is on Netflix now and we binge watched the first season and while we were doing that, they announced a tour so we thought WHY NOT? I mean, Weird Al makes an appearance in their show, they are clearly meant for me.



Also this Friday the contractor is coming out to rip up the wood floor in the kitchen and see if they can dry out everything enough to install new floor soon. We're going to go with porcelain tile. We figured for a room with three water sources, tile was better than wood. And really the only downside to porcelain is if you drop something on it, that thing will break. But I'd rather replace a mug than a floor.

Tim got me hooked on Gwent again. I hadn't played since it was in closed beta, but now it is free to play, open beta. I feel like I'm getting the hang of it but we will see how long that lasts LOL. It's like Hearthstone but a little bit more complicated? I still need to finish the first Witcher game. I really like the story, but it's sooooo clunky because it is soooo old. I could just jump into the second game, but I've got to be close to the end now so why give up?

We finished season 1 of The Expanse but Season 2 isn't on Prime yet and OMG THE CLIFF HANGER!!! I'm hoping one of the nearby libraries gets the set soon so I can request it. Or that Prime gets the second season...but I doubt that will happen until Season 3 starts up :(

I'm about halfway through BBC's Victoria because the library DVD finally had no requests on it so I could keep it for longer than 7 days. I'm enjoying it but I think part of that is my fondness for Rufus Sewell. I do like Jenna Coleman, even if I wasn't a huge Clara fan. She is working for me as Victoria.

OH and I finally watched a few episodes of Gravity Falls and I ADORE IT SO MUCH! Why was I not watching this before??

hmmmm...this makes it sound like I've just been watching a lot of TV instead of reading your posts...not entirely true but I suppose not entirely false either. Sorry about that.

Okay, I should probably sleep now...
drplacebo: (Default)
[personal profile] drplacebo
It's Forgotten Masterpiece Friday!

Hans Rott (1858-1884) is one of the great what-ifs in music history. Gustav Mahler wrote of his Vienna Conservatory roommate: "It is completely impossible to estimate what music has lost in him. His genius soars to such heights even in his first symphony, written at the age of twenty, and which makes him - without exaggeration - the founder of the new symphony as I understand it."

Rott was, in a sense, a victim of Brahms's rivalries with Wagner and Bruckner. He studied under Bruckner at the Vienna Conservatory from 1874 through 1877, and he was influenced by Wagner's work, having attended the first Bayreuth Festival in 1876. He composed the first movement of his 1st Symphony as a graduation piece in 1878 -- hence Mahler's reference to him writing it "at the age of twenty" -- and it received high praise from his teacher Bruckner. But in 1880, when Rott completed the entire symphony, he was no longer a student, he presented the piece to two of Vienna's leading conductors, Johannes Brahms and Hans Richter, in an effort to get the symphony played. It was rejected almost out of hand. Brahms, knowing Rott was his rival's student, even told the young composer he had no talent whatsoever and should give up music.

Only a few months later, Rott had a psychotic break during a train journey: he reportedly threatened another passenger with a gun, shouting that Brahms had filled the train with dynamite and ordering his fellow passenger at gunpoint to extinguish his cigar. Rott was arrested and committed to a mental hospital. After a brief recovery in 1882 and 1883 in which he was able to begin work on a second symphony, he relapsed into psychosis in 1883 and was committed a second time. A year later, he died of tuberculosis, aged just 25. Where Rott's symphony greatly influenced his friend and one-time roommate Mahler, his untimely demise contributed to the theme of human mortality that pervades Mahler's work.

As for Rott's music, Mahler kept and catalogued it to ensure that it would not be lost to posterity. But despite Mahler's lengthy career as a conductor of major orchestras, he never performed Rott's symphony. The symphony would remain unheard until Gerhard Samuel conducted the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra in its first-ever performance in 1989, more than a century after it was composed. Since then, it has been sometimes described by conductors and musicologists as "Mahler's Symphony No. 0" for the influence it had on Mahler. To be sure, it isn't a mature work; had it been rehearsed by an orchestra during his lifetime, Rott likely would have made revisions. Its orchestration is at times awkward, especially in the brass parts: modern performances generally divide its four horn parts among six players, for example. And to modern listeners, the resemblance to Mahler may be rather jarring -- but remember that Rott completed this symphony seven years before Mahler began to work on his first. Nonetheless, this is a brilliantly moving piece, full of imagination and emotional depth, and arguably one of the most important symphonies of the late Romantic era.

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[personal profile] orangerful
I try to not get too political here, but this is something near and dear to me. Public media needs support from YOU right now. Email your Congress-person with this handy form to let them know that access to public media is important for all Americans, not just ones that pay for cable or live in certain areas.

Takes just a moment - https://protectmypublicmedia.org/email-save-funding

Adulting

Jul. 11th, 2017 09:56 am
orangerful: (Default)
[personal profile] orangerful
Well, it has been a crazy few weeks. Wisconsin trip, our friend from Chicago flying out wit his 2 year old for the weekend and to top it all off, our dishwasher sprung a leak and destroyed the hardwood floor in our kitchen.

We are thinking we will replace the hardwood with something else - wood seems like a pain in the kitchen where water is always a factor. So I'm doing a bit of crowd sourcing here - what do you have for the floor in your kitchen? Pros and Cons?
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